Warmwater Fisheries Issues
  • Translated
  • fr-FR
  • ja-JP
  • de-DE
  • it-IT

Warmwater Fisheries Issues

Warmwater Fisheries Issues 

The EPA conducts standard aquatic surveys by site and state periodically and reports findings to Congress under provisions of the Clean Water Act.  The 2017 National Water Quality Inventory reports that 46% of river and stream miles are in poor biological condition, 21% of lakes are hypereutrophic and water quality of 32% of the Nation’s wetlands is degraded.  Contributing factors include nitrogen and phosphorus from fertilizer runoff; salinity; acidification; riparian disturbance; excess levels of streambed sediments; and effluents containing enterococci (bacteria).

Warmwater habitats are also experiencing adverse changes caused by invasion of non-native species.  Eurasian watermilfoil and elodea are unsuitable as shelter, food or habitat for native fish and aquatic insects and form dense vegetative mats that outcompete native plants.  Several species of invasive carp reduce vegetation abundance and diversity, stir up sediment, complete with native fish and invertebrates for food sources and increase phosphorus levels in water.  Invasive, non-native fishes compete directly with native fish for food and consume their young.  Invasive invertebrates (e.g.: New Zealand mud snails, zebra mussels, rusty crayfish) compete with native macroinvertebrates for habitat and food sources.


 

FFI's Actions

  •  

 


Black Bass Diversity - Their Conservation and Fly Fishing Opportunities with Brandon Barthel, hosted by Tom Logan The black bass are a group of freshwater fish native to eastern North America that are extremely popular with anglers. They can be caught in waterbodies that range from small order streams to mainstem rivers and from small ponds to large reservoirs. Historically, a few widely distributed bass species have received nearly all the attention. However, the discovery of numerous species over the last two decades has led to a growing interest in the diversity that exists within the group. Unique species can be captured in many southeastern US drainages, with different species often inhabiting separate habitats within a single river system. Management agencies and fishing groups have developed programs that recognize anglers that catch multiple bass species. It is hoped that this type of engagement will foster a greater appreciation for the lesser known black bass species and recognition of conservation threats that they face.

Black Bass Diversity - Their Conservation and Fly Fishing Opportunities with Brandon Barthel, hosted by Tom Logan The black bass are a group of freshwater fish native to eastern North America that are extremely popular with anglers. They can be caught in waterbodies that range from small order streams to mainstem rivers and from small ponds to large reservoirs. Historically, a few widely distributed bass species have received nearly all the attention. However, the discovery of numerous species over the last two decades has led to a growing interest in the diversity that exists within the group. Unique species can be captured in many southeastern US drainages, with different species often inhabiting separate habitats within a single river system. Management agencies and fishing groups have developed programs that recognize anglers that catch multiple bass species. It is hoped that this type of engagement will foster a greater appreciation for the lesser known black bass species and recognition of conservation threats that they face.

 


FFI's Actions

  •  

Donate to FFI's Conservation Work

We are protecting the legacy for fly fishing in All Fish, All Waters®.  Click here to make a contribution that will support our efforts.